• A clinical audiometer from Grason-Stadler

    AUDIOSTAR PRO

    CLINICAL AUDIOMETER
  • A 1.5 channel audiometer from Grason-Stadler

    PELLO

    MID-LEVEL AUDIOMETER
  • AMTAS Flex and AMTAS Pro automated audiometry from Grason-Stadler

    GSI AMTAS

    AUTOMATED AUDIOMETRY

AUDIOMETERS

An audiometer is used to evaluate a patient’s hearing thresholds. Clinicians use this equipment and their specialized knowledge to quantify a patient’s level of hearing loss over a wide range of frequencies or pitches. Using this information, an appropriate treatment plan can be developed.

Audiometers range from fully clinical, two channel instruments, to mid-level 1.5 channel diagnostic instruments, to one channel air conduction screening instruments. A clinical audiometer is the most versatile device that allows the clinician complete flexibility when performing basic and advanced audiometric evaluations on patients of all ages. Integrated special tests such as speech in noise testing and word recognition tests are included so clinicians can test a broad range of patients. A diagnostic audiometer is used to identify the type and severity of hearing loss. The device allows for basic diagnostic testing and sometimes includes the option to upgrade to specific special tests. A screening audiometer can identify the need for further audiometric testing. It is limited to pure tone screening audiometry.

The right type of hearing testing device enables audiologists to screen and diagnose a broad range of patients in their practices. GSI offers a wide range of reliable audiometer models to meet your clinical and screening needs.

CURRENT GSI AUDIOMETERS

A child undergoing pure tone audiometry testing on the Grason-Stadler AudioStar Pro

AUDIOSTAR PRO | CLINICAL AUDIOMETER

The GSI AudioStar Pro™ is a 2 channel clinical audiometer. It is designed to perform efficient audiometric evaluations on every patient population. Features include channel specific store buttons, the ability to load and review past sessions before transfer, and symbols such as unspecified bone, tinnitus, and cochlear implant. The AudioStar Pro provides flexibility and confidence in testing, making it a highly versatile option for any clinical setting.

 

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An audiologist consulting a patient over hearing test results

PELLO | MID-LEVEL AUDIOMETER

The GSI Pello™ is a 1.5 channel diagnostic audiometer with a small footprint and familiar Grason-Stadler design. This mid-level instrument is the perfect solution for a small or growing practice because of its flexibility. Four testing modules allows you to customize the device depending on what your clinic needs. Features include integrated wordlists and flexible autoplay options. The Pello is a great option for growing practices and satellite clinics.

 

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An infant undergoing tympanometry testing

GSI 39 | AUDIOMETER & TYMPANOMETER

The GSI 39 Auto Tymp™ is a flexible screening product for tympanometry, acoustic reflex measurements, and audiometry. This instrument is available in five different versions to meet the unique demands of each facility. All five versions are fast, versatile, and easy to use. Screening audiometry is available on two versions. It is possible to add additional modalities such as contralateral reflexes, or 1000 Hz probe tone as the facility’s hearing testing requirements expand.

 

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A child with circumaural headphones and a screening audiometer

GSI 18 | SCREENING AUDIOMETER

With its unsurpassed durability, the GSI 18™ is designed to be the ideal audiometer for every hearing screening situation. From educational institutions and industrial settings, to physicians’ offices and managed care facilities, this portable audiometer has the flexibility to perform hearing screenings outside of the traditional audiometry setting. It is a great option for health fairs and community events. Plus, this audiometer's ergonomic design and logical navigation make performing audiology tests simple for all users.

  

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A man using AMTAS Flex automated tablet audiometry

AMTAS FLEX | SCREENING AUTOMATED AUDIOMETRY

Patients can use AMTAS Flex™ to obtain pure tone thresholds independently, which can be reviewed by an audiologist at a later time. AMTAS Flex is easy to use and frees clinicians to address other tasks while patients complete the screening. The test is self-paced so patients may proceed at a rate that is comfortable for them. AMTAS Flex allows patients to complete a pure tone screening or air conduction threshold test in a quiet environment. Patented quality indicators ensure the validity and accuracy of the basic testing so you can move to the next step with confidence.

 

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A man being tested with AMTAS Pro automated audiometry

AMTAS PRO | DIAGNOSTIC AUTOMATED AUDIOMETRY

AMTAS™, or Automated Method for Testing Auditory Sensitivity, was created by audiologists, for audiologists. This tool is used to boost efficiency through a reliable and accurate method of automated audiometry. AMTAS Pro™ offers diagnostic air conduction, bone conduction, and speech (SRT and WRS) testing with masking. This self directed test typically takes about 15 minutes to complete and the report provides up to nine quality indicators to assist the clinician in interpretation of the accuracy of the test. AMTAS Pro is operated through a computer that is connected to a compatible GSI audiometer (i.e. AudioStar Pro or Pello).

 

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AUDIOMETRY BASICS

Find more educational materials about audiometry by visiting GSI ADVANCE.

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN DIAGNOSTIC AND SCREENING AUDIOMETRY?
Screening audiometry is used to simply identify if conductive hearing loss is an issue for the patient. The clinician will most commonly perform pure tone audiometry testing to present tones to the patient and find out at which decibel levels there may be hearing loss. If the screening audiometry testing concludes that there is hearing loss, the next step would be to use diagnostic audiometry to try and identify what exactly is going on that is causing the hearing loss and how extensive the damage is. Using this information, the clinician can determine the best course of action for the patient.

WHAT WILL AN AUDIOGRAM TELL YOU?
An audiogram is a graph of the softest sounds a patient can hear at different frequencies or pitches. The results of a hearing test are plotted on the audiogram to describe a patient’s hearing. The audiogram can give information on the type and severity of a patient’s hearing loss and help determine the most appropriate next step such as additional testing, medical referral, or hearing aids.

WHAT TYPES OF ENVIRONMENTS ARE AUDIOMETERS USED IN?
Audiometers are used in several testing environments. At audiology and ENT clinics, screening and diagnostic audiometry may be used to as a vital part of obtaining an entire hearing healthcare profile of a patient. In schools, the school nurse may use an audiometer for routine screening of children to identify if students may have a potential hearing issue. This is important to identify as early as possible so a plan of action can be made before that hearing loss affects the student’s communication skills and development.